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Angela McIver, Board Secretary and Chief Executive Officer

Angela McIver joined the Fair Housing Rights Center in Southeastern Pennsylvania as Executive Director in November 2007. By 2013, she was promoted to Chief Executive Officer and elected Board Secretary. She has over 24 years of human service experience and specializes in developing institutional and organizational networking, community partnerships, and coalitions affecting adults and youths (including the provision of counseling, related support networks, performance analysis, and training). Her former professional roles include: Executive Director of Enough Is Enough, Inc., a mentoring initiative under the auspices of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers – Local 98; Court Administrative Officer III (Resource Coordinator) for the First Judicial District of Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas Pretrial Services Division; Administrator for the School District of Philadelphia Office Secondary Education; and Case Manager and Counselor in behavioral healthcare settings at earlier times in her career. On a part-time basis from 1999-2016, she functioned as a certified Alcohol and Highway Safety School Instructor in the Commonwealth of PA. In 2016, Angela was appointed to the Pennsylvania Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights until 2020.

Angela is co-founder of Women Cultivating Women that serves to strengthen intergenerational relationships among women and empower women and girls from various socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds on social and gender specific issues. She volunteers with several community and grassroots organizations and will advocate or serve as a broker of human services for anyone who expresses the need. Formerly, she served on the Philadelphia Forensic Task Force and the Philadelphia Ex-Offenders Task Force. She also served as Vice-Chairperson and then Chair of the Montgomery County Advisory Council to the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission. She also volunteered on the Health Committee for City Lights and on the Executive Committee of the Black Male Development Symposium.

Previously, Angela produced and then hosted a segment on the talk show Dialogues on 900 AM WURD. She also produced the two-time award winning independent film, Life Isn’t Fair.

Angela is the 2014 Recipient of the Willow Grove Branch of the NAACP Humanitarian Award for Community Service. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science from Pennsylvania State University. She earned a Master of Social Services and a Master of Law and Social Policy from Bryn Mawr College.

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Carolyn Moseley, Testing Coordinator

Ms. Moseley, a seasoned housing professional with over 30 years of combined experience in housing program administration, housing and community development, real estate sales and underwriting, has been employed with Fair Housing Rights Center for 1 year where she coordinates investigations of housing transactions to determine the presence of discriminatory practices against persons protected under the Federal Fair Housing Action of 1968. Ms. Moseley is a graduate of Cheney State College where she earned her BA in Urban Affairs along with other certifications from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Fair Housing Alliance.

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Karléh Wilson, Executive Assistant to the Chief Executive Officer

Karléh Wilson grew up in small-town Louisiana where she was surrounded by the farm lands of her ancestors. After the Civil War, Wilson’s ancestors purchased the land that they were forced to toil, and set up a homestead for the future generations of Wilsons. Wilson grew up with stories of her parents’ experiences during the 70’s and 80’s, the years that integration was enforced in the deep South. Her ancestors’ victories and her parents’ experiences during the Civil Rights Era are her main motivators today.

Having lived in 5 different regions within the U.S. in only 23 years of life, Wilson’s perspectives are unique. With such an uncommon upbringing, it is unsurprising that Wilson noticed the constant systematic oppression against poor people and people of color in the United States. As a student and young adult, Wilson has worked as a grass-roots organizer to tackle political issues such as: immigration, police brutality, Flint’s water crisis, mass incarceration, and indigenous sovereignty. Her article about the metaphysics of racist naming practices on college campuses was published in the Boston Review in 2016. Wilson graduated from Yale with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy after writing her senior thesis on Racial Contempt.

Wilson’s current professional goals are focused on Fair Housing Rights and Education Policy. The broad network of political concerns that Wilson has worked toward each reach resolve to the idea that all of Humanity is deserving of equal access to opportunities, democracy, and love.

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