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444 N 3rd Street, Suite 110
Philadelphia, PA 19123
Monday - Friday
08:30 AM - 5:00 PM

“When all is said and done, the real citadel of strength of any community is in the hearts and minds and desires of those who dwell there.” – Everett Dirksen

Community Engagement

The Fair Housing Act is a broad and powerful piece of civil rights legislation because it has three components: Protected classes (race, color, religion, national origin, gender, familial status, and disability), Covered transactions (sales, rental,

insurance, lending, and appraisals), and Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH). The latter is significant because it requires a jurisdiction that accepts federal Community Development Block Grant funding to certify that it will not engage in discriminatory housing practices and take active steps to remove barriers to housing discrimination. Unfortunately, the public does not know enough and understand how to use AFFH during local Comprehensive Planning processes. Through community engagement, the public is entitled to weigh in on community development projects that last for several years.

FHRC is committed to raising public knowledge and awareness of the role of AFFH in undoing the vestiges of redlining in underserved communities.

1964Civil Rights Act

42 U.S.C. § 2000d-1Title VI prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance.

1968Fair Housing Rights Act

42 U.S.C. §§ 3601-19 Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (Fair Housing Act), as amended, prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental, and financing of dwellings, and in other housing-related transactions, because of race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin, and disability. It also requires that all federal programs relating to housing and urban development be administered in a manner that affirmatively furthers fair
housing.

1994Violence Against Women Act

42 U.S.C. § 14043e–11 VAWA provide housing protections for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking in many of HUD’s housing programs. VAWA also requires the establishment of emergency transfer plans for facilitating the emergency relocation of certain tenants who are victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

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Tenants with Disabilities

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Compliance Training

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Information and Referral

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Health and Housing

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Housing Laws

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Community Engagement